No Annual Fees Card

Tracking down a credit card with no annual fees is easier than you think. Our credit card comparison can help you better understand your options when it comes to cards like these. We even include information about interest-free periods, repayment obligations, and more!

Compare now to find a no annual fee credit card that suits your needs.

Select cards to compare
Annual Fee
Purchase Rate
Balance Transfer
Annual Fee $0 p.a.
Purchase Rate 14.99% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 12 months

reverts to 14.99% p.a.
A one-off credit plan establishment fee of 3% applies to any balances transferred% balance transfer fee applies

Enjoy low interest rates with no annual fee
Annual Fee $0 p.a.
Purchase Rate 19.99% p.a.
Balance Transfer 2.99% p.a. for 9 months

reverts to 19.99% p.a.

A low intro balance transfer rate with no annual fee and Platinum benefits
Annual Fee $0 p.a.
Purchase Rate 19.99% p.a.
Balance Transfer 2.99% p.a. for 9 months

reverts to 19.99% p.a.

A low intro balance transfer rate with no annual fee
Annual Fee $0 p.a.
Purchase Rate 20.74% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 12 months

reverts to 20.74% p.a.
1% balance transfer fee applies

Earn 1 Velocity Point per $1 spent, except government bodies in Australia where you will earn 0.5 Velocity Points per $1 spent
Annual Fee $0 p.a.
Purchase Rate 20.74% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 12 months

reverts to 20.74% p.a.
1% balance transfer fee applies

Earn 1 Qantas Point for every $1 spent on Card purchases, except spend at government bodies in Australia where you will earn 0.5 Qantas Points per $1 spent. No annual fee and 0% balance transfer rate for the first 12 months. Earn rewards faster by getting a Supplementary card at no additional costs
Annual Fee $0 p.a. for 12 months

reverts to $49 p.a.

Purchase Rate 19.99% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 14 months

reverts to 21.99% p.a.

$50 Woolworths eGift Card if you apply by 30th June and make an eligible purchase by 31st July 2018.
Annual Fee $55 p.a.
Purchase Rate 13.74% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 18 months

reverts to 19.49% p.a.
1% balance transfer fee applies

0% p.a. for 18 months (1% balance transfer fee applies). BT revert rate to variable cash advance rate.
Annual Fee $0 p.a. for 12 months

reverts to $80 p.a.

Purchase Rate 18.79% p.a.
Balance Transfer 20.99% p.a.
25,000 bonus Reward Points when you spend $2,500 on eligible purchases in the first 3 months + $0 annual fee for the first year
Annual Fee $0 p.a. for 12 months

reverts to $87 p.a.

Purchase Rate 19.74% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 18 months

reverts to 21.49% p.a.
2% balance transfer fee applies

0% p.a.for the first 18 months on balance transfers (T&C's and a 2% Balance Transfer fee applies).
Annual Fee $0 p.a. for 12 months

reverts to $90 p.a.

Purchase Rate 19.84% p.a.
Balance Transfer 0% p.a. for 20 months

reverts to 21.29% p.a.
2% balance transfer fee applies

$0 annual card fee in 1st year and 0% p.a. for 20 months on balance transfers (2% balance transfer fee applies). Rate then switches to applicable variable cash advance rate

Advantages of a credit card with no annual fees

If you only plan to use your credit card for emergencies and/or repay the balance each month, looking for low to no annual fees could be a good option. The costs associated with your card will be lower as your balance is kept to a minimum. Essentially, this is a fine option for sensible spenders.

Disadvantages of ‘no annual fee’ cards

With no annual fee credit cards, the interest rate is likely to be higher to make up for a lack of fees. Because of this, make a note of the interest-free period when choosing your card. Otherwise, you may end up paying more than you’d like in interest. Additionally, cards with no annual fees may sport fewer reward program incentives or complimentary benefits (like travel insurance).

Some lenders will offer to waive your annual fee for the life of your credit card, while others may offer this only for an introductory period (e.g. one year). Similarly, any rewards offered in return for no annual fees are often less impressive than what you may find with other cards.

Keep these things in mind if you are looking for a good ‘return on investment’ for your spending.

Common credit card fees and how to avoid them
You may not have to pay an annual fee, but that doesn’t mean you’ll owe zero fees. Here are some of the more common credit card fees and surcharges you may encounter, and how to avoid them.

  • Purchase interest. While not a ‘fee’ strictly speaking, interest can quickly become a financial burden if you’re not careful. The interest you owe is charged as a percentage of new purchases, as a ‘fee’ for borrowing from your lender. To avoid this, choose a card with an interest-free period, and pay off your balance before this period ends.
  • Cash advance interest. When you withdraw money from an ATM, or draw a cheque on credit, you’ll be charged interest immediately on the amount taken out. If you’d like to avoid this, use alternative means to get cash (e.g. use a transaction account or debit card).
  • Balance transfer interest and fees. Moving your outstanding balance from one card to another may incur interest as well as an administration fee. 0% interest and $0 fee balance transfer cards do exist, and can be a sensible option when tackling debt.
  • Foreign transaction fees. Do you plan to use your card while travelling overseas? You may end up owing a percentage of what you paid in foreign transaction fees. You may also owe fees when using overseas ATMs. There are many ways to avoid this, ranging from using cash to pay for things, or taking out a travel money card before you depart Australia.
  • Dishonour fee. This fee is charged when you don’t have the credit (or available funds on a charge card) to fulfil a payment. For example, you have a direct debit set up, but you reach your limit. You may incur a fee if the direct debit tries to take money from the account and fails. Always ensure you have enough credit or cash available to meet your payments.
  • Late payment fee. If you pay off your credit card late, you’ll likely incur a fee. Consider a direct debit if you often miss the deadline for paying bills on time, or pay the balance off in smaller increments throughout the month.
  • Over the limit fee. When you exceed your credit limit, you could be charged a fee (although some providers may just prevent you from making any further purchases).
  • Additional statement fee. A fee you may owe if you ask for an additional statement of your account and balance.
  • Paper statement fee. If you choose paper statements over online ones, certain lenders charge a fee.
  • Non-bank ATM fee. Withdrawing money from an ATM that your bank doesn’t have an agreement with (or own) could result in an additional fee.
  • Chargeback fee. A fee to reverse a charge made on your card.
  • Card replacement fee. A fee owed if you ask your lender for a new or replacement card.
  • Additional cardholder fee. A fee for adding another person to your account.